News

Upcoming COG-UK Showcase Event – 16th Dec 2020

SARS-CoV-2 sequencing to inform clinical care, public health interventions and policy decisions

 

On the afternoon of the 16th of December, the COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) Consortium will be presenting its first ‘Showcase Event’ with three sessions covering some of the major areas of work for COG-UK over the last 8 months, including evidence on SARS-CoV-2 lineage introduction and transmission, an overview of genomics-informed evidence on transmission in specific environments, and mutations and their implications for transmission, disease severity, therapeutics and vaccines.

As you will see from the below draft programme, we have an outstanding line-up of speakers, representing leaders in their field.

The showcase is free and open for anyone to attend, although attendee number is finite and so early registration is advised.

 

To register and receive access details, please email COGconsortium@medschl.cam.ac.uk

 

Draft Programme:

14.00

Welcome from the Director of COG-UK  –  Sharon Peacock

14.05

Opening remarks, Sir Patrick Vallance, CSA, England

 

Session 1 – Overview of the Four Nations Experience: lineage introduction and transmission

Chair –  Rob Orford

14.10 – Scotland – Matt Holden

14.20 – Wales – Tom Connor

14.30 – Northern Ireland – Derek Fairley

14.40 – England – Meera Chand

14.50 – Summary and Implications for policy and practice – Deenan Pilay

 

15.00 – break

 

Session 2 – Overview of Genomic-Informed Evidence on Transmission in Specific Environments

Chair – David Crossman

15.10 – Hospitals – Estee Torok

15.20 – Care homes – Dinesh Aggarwal

15.30 – Universities – Ben Warne

15.40 – Sentinel surveillance using pillar 2 samples – Jeff Barratt

15.50 – The HOCI study – Judy Breuer

16.00 – Summary and implications for policy and practice – Gordon Dougan

 

16.10 – break

 

Session 3 – SARS-CoV-2 Mutations – Implications for Transmission, Disease Severity, Therapeutics and Vaccines

Chair: Ian Young

16.20 – Overview: prevalence, tracking and importance – David Robertson

16.30 – Mutations and transmissibility – Erik Volz

16.40 – Mutations and clinical consequences – Emma Thomson

16.50 – SARS-CoV-2 mutational escape from therapeutic convalescent plasma – Ravi Gupta

17.00 – Coordination of mutation data for public health use – Alessandro Carabelli

 

17.10 – Closing remarks from the Director of COG-UK, Sharon Peacock

 

 

The current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2, represents a major threat to health. The COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) consortium has been created to deliver large-scale and rapid whole-genome virus sequencing to local NHS centres and the UK government.

Led by Professor Sharon Peacock of the University of Cambridge and Director of Science (Pathogen Genomics), Public Health England, COG-UK is made up of an innovative partnership of NHS organisations, the four Public Health Agencies of the UK, the Wellcome Sanger Institute and twelve academic partners providing sequencing and analysis capacity. A full list of collaborators can be found here: https://www.cogconsortium.uk/about/. Professor Peacock is also on a part-time secondment to PHE as Director of Science, where she focuses on the development of pathogen sequencing through COG-UK.

COG-UK was established in March 2020 supported by £20 million funding from the UK Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, administered by UK Research and Innovation.